Proper Treatment of Malaria Made Easier With PRIMO

Aug 2008
Under the leadership of Rwanda's National Malaria Control Program and with support from the President's Malaria Initiative in Rwanda, Population Services International (PSI) designed a branded name – PRIMO – and package for Coartem.
Deborah and her daughter, Vanessa, in Rwanda Source: Population Services International

Children Depend on Rapid and Safe Treatment of Malaria

"If your child's temperature increases, please immediately take him or her to receive PRIMO," urged Deborah, a mother of an 8-month-old daughter who recently suffered from malaria. "I can assure you, this medicine is effective and saves children's lives – I was witness to it."

Under the leadership of Rwanda's National Malaria Control Program and with support from the President's Malaria Initiative in Rwanda, Population Services International (PSI) designed a branded name – PRIMO – and package for Coartem. Coartem is a lifesaving drug that has been especially effective in reducing malaria-related mortality in children under the age of 5.PRIMO Red is for children aged 6 months to 3 years. PRIMO Yellow is for children aged 3 to 5 years.

PRIMO comes in a special package with easy-to-understand illustrated instructions in order to ensure that children receive the correct doses and full regimen of treatment.

PRIMO is readily available for children and families in both the private and public sectors. PRIMO is provided at a highly subsidized price in the private sector in order for all children to have access to one of the best treatments available. Dedicated voluntary health workers also deliver treatment to sick children in their communities within 24 hours of the onset of malaria.

 Illustrated instructions with captions in Kinyarwanda, the local language, ensure proper usage.

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