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PMI: Presidents Malaria Initiative - Saving lives in Africa.

PMI Results

A mother and her daughter are protected by a long-lasting insecticide-treated mosquito net in Senegal.
A mother and her daughter are protected by a long-lasting insecticide-treated mosquito net in Senegal.
Source: Maggie Hallahan Photography

The past decade has seen unprecedented progress in malaria control efforts in most sub-Saharan African countries. As countries have scaled-up insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs), indoor residual spraying (IRS), improved diagnostic tests, and highly effective antimalarial drugs, mortality in children under five years of age has fallen dramatically. It is now clear that the cumulative efforts and funding by the Presidentís Malaria Initiative, national governments, The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, the World Bank and many other donors are working: the risk of malaria is declining. According to the World Health Organizationís 2012 World Malaria Report, the estimated annual number of global malaria deaths has fallen by more than one-third Ė from about 985,000 in 2000 to about 660,000 in 2010.

This page summarizes the progress PMI has achieved after seven years of implementation. For more details, please access the PMI Seventh Annual Report, April 2013 [PDF, 4.55MB].

Click on any of the charts below to see a larger image.

Progress After Seven Years of Implementation

PMI CONTRIBUTIONS AT A GLANCE: Year 1 (2006)	Year 2 (2007)	Year 3 (2008) 	
Year 4 (2009)	Year 5 (2010)	Year 6 (FY 2011)* Year 7 (FY 2012) Cumulative. 


People protected by IRS (houses sprayed):
2,097,056 (414,456); 18,827,709 (4,353,747); 25,157,408 (6,101,271);	
26,965,164 (6,656,524); 27,199,063 (6,693,218); 28,344,173 (7,004,903);
30,297,000 (7,127,040);	N/A2.

ITNs procured:
1,047,393; 5,210,432; 6,481,827; 15,160,302; 18,592,039; 23,174,496;
21,407,129; 82,743,618 (62,133,406 distributed).

ITNs procured by other donors and distributed with PMI support:
369,900; 1,287,624; 2,966,011; 11,728,674; 19,307,756; 10,927,791; 42,834,823.

IPTp treatments procured:
583,333; 1,784,999; 1,657,998; 6,264,752; 4,701,162; 4,493,217; 18,287,462; (13,455,244
distributed).

Health workers trained in IPTp4:
1,994; 3,153; 12,557; 14,015; 14,146; 28,872; 23,540; N/A.

RDTs procured:
1,004,875; 2,082,600; 2,429,000; 6,254,000; 13,340,910; 14,572,510; 28,957,905; 62,539,290; (36,639,400 distributed).

Health workers trained in malaria diagnosis (RDTs and/or microscopy):
1,370; 1,663; 2,856; 17,335; 34,740; 28,210; N/A.

ACT treatments procured:
1,229,550; 8,851,820; 22,354,139; 21,833,155; 41,048,295; 38,588,220; 72,345,860; 189,168,489 (136,345,896
distributed).

ACT treatments procured by other donors and distributed with PMI support: 
8,709,140; 112,330; 8,855,401; 3,536,554; 6,993,809; 275,966; 27,418,000.

Health workers trained in treatment with ACTs:	
8,344; 20,864; 35,397; 41,273; 36,458; 42,183; 39,797; N/A.
  1. The data reported in this table are up-to-date as of September 30, 2012, and include all PMI focus countries and the Greater Mekong Subregion. In addition, during FY 2012, the U.S. Government provided support for malaria prevention and control activities in other countries. For data by country, see Appendix 2 of the Presidentís Malaria Initiative 7th Annual Report to Congress.
  2. For Year 6, PMI transitioned from a calendar year to a fiscal year reporting schedule.
  3. A cumulative count of people protected by IRS is not provided because most areas were sprayed on more than one occasion.
  4. Amount distributed to health facilities.
  5. These figures include health workers who were trained in focused antenatal care in Rwanda, where IPTp is not national policy.
  6. A cumulative count of individual health workers trained is not provided because some health workers were trained on more than one occasion.

Impact on Mortality of Children Under Five Years of Age

  • In all 12 PMI focus countries with baseline and follow-up nationwide household surveys, substantial reductions in all-cause mortality (ranging from 16 to 50 percent) have been documented in children under the age of five.
Reductions in All-Cause Mortality Rates of Children Under Five. Deaths per 1000 live births. Angola: 23% decrease from 118 (2010) to 91 (2011). Ethiopia: 28% decrease from 123 (2006) to 88 (2011). Ghana: 28% decrease from 111 (2006) to 80 (2009). Kenya: 36% decrease from 115 (2006) to 74 (2009). Madagascar: 23% decrease from 94 (2006) to 72 (2009).  Malawi: 133 (2002) 16% decrease from 122 (2006) to 112 (2011). Mozambique: 153 (2002-2006) 37% decrease to 97 (2010-2011). Rwanda: 50% decrease from 152 (2006) to 103 (2009) to 76 (2011). Senegal: 40% decrease from 121 (2006) to 85 (2009) to 72 (2011). Tanzania: 28% decrease from 112 (2006) to 91 (2009) to 81 (2011). Uganda: 34% from 137 (2006) to 90 (2011). Zambia: 29% from 168 (2006) to 119 (2009). The PMI focus countries included in this graph have at least two data points from nationwide household surveys that measured mortality in children under the age of five. These data are drawn from Demographic and Health Surveys, Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, and, in a small number of cases, from Malaria Indicator Surveys with expanded sample sizes. In some countries, two surveys were conducted within the same period. In Angola, both estimates for under-five mortality are derived from the 2011 Malaria Indicator Survey.
The PMI focus countries included in this graph have at least two data points from nationwide household surveys that measure mortality in children under the age of five. These data are drawn from Demographic and Health Surveys, Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, and, in a small number of cases, from Malaria Indicator Surveys with expanded sample sizes. In some countries, two surveys were conducted within the same period. In Angola, both estimates for under-five mortality are derived from the 2011 Malaria Indicator Survey.

Coverage of Malaria Interventions

In countries where at least two comparable nationwide household surveys have been conducted since the launch of PMI activities:

  • Household ownership of at least one ITN increased from an average* of 36 to 60 percent.
Increasing ITN Ownership. 90% is the PMI Target. % Household ITN Ownership.  Angola: 2006, 11%; 2011, 35%.Benin: 2006, 25%; 2011, 80. Ethiopia: 2006, 41%; 2011, 44%.  Ghana: 2006, 19%; 2009, 33%. Kenya: 2007, 48%; 2009, 56%; 2011, 48%. Liberia: 2006, 47%; 2011, 50%. Madagascar: 2009, 73%; 2011, 94%. Malawi: 2006, 38%; 2011, 58%. Mali: 2006, 50%; 2011, 85%. Rwanda: 2006, 15%; 2009, 56%; 2011, 82%. Senegal: 2006, 36%; 2009, 60%; 2011, 63%. Tanzania: 2006, 23%; 2009, 39%; 2011, 64%. Uganda: 2006, 16%; 2009, 47%; 2011, 60%. Zambia: 2006, 38%; 2009, 62%; 2011, 64%. The PMI focus countries included in this graph have at least two data point for ITN ownership from nationwide household surveys (Demographic and Health Surveys, Malaria Indicator Surveys, or Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys). In some countries, two surveys were conducted within the same period.
The PMI focus countries included in this graph have at least two data points for ITN ownership from nationwide household surveys (Demographic and Health Surveys, Malaria Indicator Surveys, or Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys). In some countries, two surveys were conducted within the same period.

  • Usage of an ITN increased from an average* of 22 to 43 percent for children under five years and about the same for pregnant women.
Increasing ITN Use among Children Under Five. 85% is the PMI Target. % ITN Use among Children Under Five: Angola: 2006, 18%; 2011, 26%. Benin: 2006, 20%; 2011 71%. Ghana: 2006, 22%; 2009, 28%; Kenya: 2007, 39%; 2009, 47%; 2011, 42%; Liberia: 2006, 26%; 2011, 37%. Madagascar: 2009, 58%; 2011, 89%; Malawi: 2006, 25%; 2011, 70%. Mali: 2006, 27%; 2011, 70%. Mozambique: 2006, 7%; 2011, 35%. Rwanda: 2006, 13%; 2009, 57%; 2011, 70%; Senegal: 2006, 16%; 2009, 29%; 2011, 35%; Tanzania: 2006, 16%; 2009, 26%; 2011, 64%; Uganda: 2006, 10%; 2009, 33%; 2011, 43%; Zambia: 2006, 24%; 2009, 41%; 2011, 50%. The Pmi Focus countries included in this graph have at least two data points for ITN use among children under five from nationwide household surveys (Demographic and Health or Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys). In some countries, two surveys were conducted within the same period.
The PMI focus countries included in this graph have at least two data points for ITN use among children under five from nationwide household surveys (Demographic and Health Surveys, Malaria Indicator Surveys, or Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys). In some countries, two surveys were conducted during the same period.

  • The proportion of pregnant women who received two or more doses of intermittent preventive treatment for pregnant women (IPTp2) for the prevention of malaria increased from an average* of 15 to 29 percent.
Increasing IPTp2 Rates. 85% is the PMI Target: Angola: 2006, 3%; 2011, 18%. Benin: 2012, 23%. Ghana: 2006, 25%; 2009, 44%; 2012, 65%. Kenya: 2006, 13%; 2009, 14%; 2011, 25%; Liberia: 2006, 4%; 2009, 45%; 2012, 50%. Madagascar: 2009, 6%; 2011, 20%; Malawi: 2006, 43%; 2011, 60%; Senegal: 2006, 12%; 2009, 52%; 2011, 39%; Tanzania: 2006, 22%; 2009, 30%; 2011, 26%; Uganda: 2006, 16%; 2009, 32%; 2011, 25%; Zambia: 2006, 57%; 2009, 60%; 2011, 69%.
The PMI focus countries included in this graph have at least two data points for IPTp2 from nationwide household surveys (Demographic and Health Surveys, Malaria Indicator Surveys, Malaria Indicator Surveys Cluster Surveys). In some countries, two surveys were conducted within the same period. IPTp2 is defined as at least two doses of SP during the last pregnancy, with at least one dose given during an antenatal clinic visit.

*defined as the median of the percent coverage

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