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PMI: Presidents Malaria Initiative - Saving lives in Africa.

About The President's Malaria Initiative

 Workers trained in Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS) march on World Malaria Day in Agoro Sare, Kenya. Source: James Kei/The Standard
Workers trained in IRS march on World Malaria Day in Agoro Sare, Kenya. Source: James Kei/The Standard

Launched in 2005, the President's Malaria Initiative (PMI) is a five-year, $1.2 billion expansion of U.S. Government resources to reduce the intolerable burden of malaria and help relieve poverty on the African continent. The goal of PMI is to reduce malaria-related deaths by 50 percent in 19 countries in Africa that have a high burden of malaria by expanding coverage of four highly effective malaria prevention and treatment measures to the most vulnerable populations: pregnant women and children under five years of age. These interventions include insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs), indoor residual spraying (IRS) with insecticides, intermittent preventive treatment for pregnant women (IPTp), and prompt use of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) for those who have been diagnosed with malaria. Read Fast Facts About PMI [PDF, 490KB].

The 2008 Lantos-Hyde Act authorized an expanded PMI program for 2009-2013. PMI is a key component of the U.S. Government's Global Health Initiative, which was announced by President Obama in May 2009. As a result, the PMI strategy [PDF, 483KB] was revised to achieve Africa-wide impact by halving the burden of malaria in 70 percent of at-risk populations in sub-Saharan Africa – or approximately 450 million people. A comprehensive external evaluation of PMI was conducted in 2011.

Leadership

Background

Structure: PMI is an interagency initiative led by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and implemented together with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). It is overseen by a U.S. Global Malaria Coordinator and an Interagency Steering Group made up of representatives of USAID, CDC/HHS, the Department of State, the Department of Defense, the National Security Council, and the Office of Management and Budget.

Cover image for the PMI Seventh Annual Report, April 2013.
Read the PMI Seventh Annual Report - April 2013 [PDF, 4.55MB].

Country Selection: The 19 countries in Africa were selected and approved by the Coordinator and the Interagency Steering Group using the following criteria:

  • High malaria disease burden
  • National malaria control policies consistent with the internationally accepted standards of the World Health Organization
  • Capacity to implement such policies
  • Willingness to partner with the United States to fight malaria
  • Involvement of other international donors and partners in national malaria control efforts

Funding: Funding for PMI was $30 million in fiscal year 2006, $135 million in fiscal year 2007, $300 million in each of fiscal years 2008 and 2009, $500 million in fiscal year 2010, and $578 million in fiscal year 2011.

Partnerships

Partnerships are at the heart of PMI's strategy and operational plans. PMI works closely with host country governments; other U.S. Government agencies; international organizations; other bilateral, multilateral, and private donors; nongovernmental and faith-based organizations; and the private sector. Achieving the ambitious PMI coverage targets and reducing malaria deaths by half across 19 countries in Africa can only be achieved through a coordinated approach with a broad partner base, at both the country and international levels. PMI has forged strong partnerships in all PMI focus countries.

Who We Work With

Image containing the following logos: U.S. Department of State, National Institutes of Health (HHS/NIH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (HHS/CDC), World Health Organization (WHO), The World Bank, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria, the American Red Cross, and the Roll Back Malaria Partnership. U.S. Department of State National Institutes of Health (NIH) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Health Organization (WHO) The World Bank United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria American Red Cross Roll Back Malaria Partnership