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PMI: Presidents Malaria Initiative - Saving lives in Africa.

Rear Adm. Tim Ziemer, U.S. Global Malaria Coordinator

Photo of Rear Adm. Tim Ziemer, U.S. Malaria Coordinator
   

R. Timothy Ziemer
Rear Admiral, United States Navy (Retired)

U.S. Global Malaria Coordinator

Rear Admiral Tim Ziemer was appointed in June 2006 to lead the President's Malaria Initiative (PMI), a historic $1.2 billion, five-year initiative to control malaria in Africa. In 2008, the Lantos-Hyde Act authorized an expansion of PMI, and, in 2009, it was included as a key component of the U.S. Government's Global Health Initiative. The PMI strategy is targeted to achieve Africa-wide impact by halving the burden of malaria in 70 percent of at-risk populations in sub-Saharan Africa, approximately 450 million people, thereby removing malaria as a major public health problem and promoting economic growth and development throughout the region.

PMI is a collaborative U.S. Government effort, led by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) in conjunction with the Department of Health and Human Services (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), the Department of State, the White House, and others. As coordinator, Rear Admiral Ziemer reports to the USAID administrator and has direct authority over both PMI and USAID malaria programs.

Rear Admiral Ziemer was born in Sioux City, Iowa, but was raised in Asia, the son of missionary parents serving in Vietnam. After graduating from Wheaton College, he joined the Navy, completed flight school, and returned to Vietnam during the war.

During his naval career, Rear Admiral Ziemer commanded several squadrons, naval stations, and an air wing supporting the first Gulf War. Subsequent assignments included serving as the senior fellow with the Navy's Strategic Studies Program at the Naval War College, and Deputy Director for Operations in the National Military Operations Center on the Joint Command Staff.

Prior to his appointment at PMI, Rear Admiral Ziemer previously served as Executive Director of World Relief, a humanitarian organization headquartered in Baltimore.

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